New Study Casts Doubt on Current "Despair" Models of Addiction

The recent Hari/Hart/Lewis hypothesis that addiction is not primarily metabolic or genetic, but rather the result of "despair" or "sociological conditions"...

New Study Casts Doubt on Current "Despair" Models of Addiction
04June

New Study Casts Doubt on Current "Despair" Models of Addiction

Written by Jared Davisin Section Latest Articles

The recent Hari/Hart/Lewis hypothesis that addiction is not primarily metabolic or genetic, but rather the result of "despair" or "sociological conditions" or "flawed learning," takes a major hit in a new report appearing in The National Bureau of Economic Research. The study suggests that "changes in economic conditions account for less than one-tenth of the rise in drug and opioid-involved mortality rates." 

The narrative that the opioid and overdose crisis is a product of despair was becoming very popular. The logic is that people in bad economic conditions are more likely to turn to opioids to cope with their circumstances and that their hopeless environmental conditions make them more likely to die of an overdose. This model frames addiction and overdose as "diseases of despair."

See the original post published on Addictionrecoverynews.com and written by Jason Schwartz on January 19, 2018

Jason Schwartz at Addiction & Recovery News does a deep dive into the flawed thinking behind the new (old?) sociological views of addiction here.